Your physical health can affect your relationship and your sex life. Take your time to get back to having sex and don’t forget there are other ways to feel connected like kissing, touching or massage. Just spending time together will make you feel intimate and close.

“How long should I wait…?”

Sex is a form of exercise. If you can climb two flights of stairs non-stop without pain or shortness of breath, that’s a good directive that you are ready again.

You may feel less interested in sex, or feel less able for a while. This could be due to being tired or anxious, or it could be caused by your medication. This is normal, and the feeling usually only lasts for a short time.

Your sex life doesn’t have to be on hold for too long. If you’re thinking about it, here are some recommendations:

  • Wait two to four weeks after your heart attack before having sex again, unless you’ve had surgery.
  • If you’ve had surgery, wait until you’re healed (usually six to eight weeks). Find a comfortable position and don’t put any stress or pressure on your chest / breast-bone.
  • Avoid having sex after a heavy meal – it can give you stomach problems and lead to chest pain
  • Don’t drink too much alcohol before having sex as it could make you lightheaded and may cause your heart beat to become irregular.

“Something isn’t quite right… down there.”

Some medicines can affect your sex life. They may, for example, give the following complaints:

  • vaginal dryness
  • disinterested in sex and reduced libido
  • not being able to achieve orgasm
  • which prevents you from getting or maintaining an erection.

Speak to your GP if you are worried about any of these. Don’t stop or change any medication without talking to your GP.